IMPORTANT UPDATE: On March 4, Frances Online will replace the Online Claim System. This means there will be temporary customer service interruptions starting as early as 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 27.  Phone and online support will also be unavailable Feb. 28 through March 1. Learn more at unemployment.oregon.gov/frances

Protect Yourself from Fraud

When Oregon workers apply for unemployment insurance benefits, we require them to take steps to verify their identity. This is an important part of preventing fraud and helping to protect workers from identity theft. For example, someone else could try to use your personal information to request and receive unemployment benefits under your name. This is considered identity theft as well as being a type of fraudulent claim. If you need your benefits in the future, the previous identity theft could delay or otherwise affect your ability to get benefits.

Unemployment insurance fraud is a national issue, and combating fraud is an agency priority. Below are some additional steps to help you protect yourself from fraud, scams, and identity theft. There are also resources for reporting them if they occur.

Recognize and Avoid Unemployment Insurance Scams

Beware of “phishing” attacks, which are messages designed to trick people into clicking on a link or sharing information. People may try to steal your information by impersonating OED or other government agencies through text messages, emails, or other communication channels. Don’t click on links in text messages.

Use our established websites and communication channels:

  • Don’t trust UI information from unofficial websites. You can read information about and watch videos about the Unemployment Insurance Program at unemployment.oregon.gov.
  • Oregon’s websites end in “.gov” or “.state.or.us”. Web sites that end in other suffixes are not a safe place to log into and check your unemployment benefits. Don’t trust unemployment insurance information from unofficial websites.
  • Don’t use a scam site. If you’re not sure, start at unemployment.oregon.gov. You can find direct links to the official Online Claim System and other safe links there.
  • You can find frequently asked questions and the Contact Us form at oedcontactus.oregon.gov.
  • Make sure you’re interacting with the Oregon Employment Department’s official social media accounts. We are active on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and LinkedIn. We may ask for your contact information, but we will never ask for a password, PIN, or SSN through social media.
  • If you get a call from an investigator, you can check the name of that person to confirm if they work for the Oregon Employment Department at employeesearch.dasapp.oregon.gov. Call the number listed on the employee search site.

Be wary of scams. We will never ask for money in exchange for you to receive your benefits. Take these steps to protect yourself against scams:

  • We do not text claimants.
  • Never give out your personal information to an unsolicited email or text message.
  • Ignore any requests for money or fees to help you get unemployment insurance benefits.
  • Check to make sure your payments arrive on time. If a payment is late (and it’s not because of a holiday), contact us right away.
  • Don’t share your personal information, PIN, or passwords with anyone.
  • Don’t reuse PINs and passwords. If you have, change them.
  • Don’t use PINs or passwords that include the name or birthdates of friends and family members.
  • Use unique and complex PINs and passwords.

Signs of Identity Theft

Most victims of unemployment insurance identity theft don’t know that claims for unemployment insurance benefits have been filed and that benefits have been collected using their identities. Many people only find out unemployment insurance identity theft occurred when they receive something in the mail, such as a payment or state-issued 1099-G tax form that is wrong or that reflects benefits they did not receive.

You may be a victim of unemployment insurance identity theft if:

  • You’ve received a letter from us about your unemployment insurance claim, but you have not filed a claim.
  • You’ve received unemployment insurance benefit checks from us in the mail, but you have not filed a claim for benefits.
  • Your employer has informed you that they received notice from the Employment Department that you have filed a claim, but you have not filed a claim.
  • You’ve received a 1099-G form, but you did not file a claim for unemployment insurance benefits. This is an example of a 1099-G form.

What to Do if You Receive Documents from the Employment Department but Did Not File for Benefits

If you receive a 1099-G tax form from the Employment Department, and you did not file a claim or receive unemployment benefits, contact us immediately with our online form or by calling 503-947-1995 or 1-877-668-3204. If we confirm that identity theft took place, you won’t need to report the amount on the 1099-G to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). We will send you an amended 1099-G tax form.

If you receive benefit checks or a U.S. Bank Reliacard®, call us at 877-345-3484 or use the Contact Us form. Mail the checks to the Employment Department:

Oregon Employment Department

PO Box 14130

Salem, OR 97309

Please include a brief explanation of why you are returning these items so that we know what action to take. Once we confirm that identity theft has taken place, we will cancel the checks and the fraudulent unemployment insurance claim.

ID Theft Reporting Form

Please use the form below if you think someone stole your identity to get unemployment insurance benefits. A member of our team will reach out to you regarding your identity theft claim. You can also call 503-947-1995 or 1-877-668-3204.

ID Theft Reporting Form

What to Do if You Are a Victim of Identity Theft

If you are a victim of identity theft, you can take several steps. These steps can help protect your finances and limit further fraudulent activity:

Tell the Oregon Employment Department about Identity Theft

  • Report unemployment insurance identity theft to us as soon as possible by reporting it through the Employment Department ID Theft Reporting form or by calling us at 503-947-1995 or 1-877-668-3204.
    • You might receive a call from an investigator if we need more information. NOTE: We might call from a phone number that your phone shows as unlisted or blocked. Your caller ID might not say the call is from the Oregon Employment Department. We will leave a voicemail with information on how to contact us. If we can’t leave a voicemail, we will send a letter.
    • If you have any concerns that the caller is not from the Oregon Employment Department, you may end the call and contact us directly using the options on the Ways to Contact Us page. However, this will cause a delay for us in working on your claim.
    • We might request additional documentation (like a police report or a sworn affidavit) in order to complete the investigation.
    • If you received a Form 1099-G for benefits you didn’t receive, please tell us immediately. We can issue a corrected Form 1099-G and update the tax record with the IRS on your behalf.
    • If you received a check when you didn’t file a claim, please follow the instructions above for returning it. If you already spent the money or delayed returning it, we encourage you to contact us immediately. Otherwise, you are responsible to report it on your tax returns, and you might receive a bill for a fraudulent overpayment in the future. (An overpayment is when you received benefits you were not eligible to receive.)
  • Request a copy of your Wage and Benefit Report from the Oregon Employment Department to check it for accuracy. You can request a copy through the Contact Us page or by calling (877) 345-3484.

Tell the Authorities About Identity Theft

  • Report identity theft with the Federal Trade Commission at 1-877-ID-THEFT (438-4338) or visit identitytheft.gov.
  • Contact your local police department.
  • Notify the Office of Inspector General, at oig.ssa.gov/report, if your Social Security Number (SSN) has been fraudulently used.
  • Contact the IRS to report the identity theft and that your SSN was used to file a fraudulent unemployment insurance claim. Visit the IRS website to learn how to file your taxes after unemployment insurance fraud or identity theft.

Watch Your Accounts

  • Work with a tax professional or follow IRS instructions to file your taxes if you received an incorrect 1099-G due to fraud.
  • Check your credit report for suspicious activity or unauthorized lines of credit opened.
  • Change online account passwords and make your passwords difficult so others cannot easily access your accounts.
  • Contact your financial providers (banks and credit card companies) to flag irregular transactions.

Report Unemployment Insurance Fraud

If you have information about unemployment insurance fraud, please complete our fraud referral at the link below or call 503-947-1995 or 1-877-668-3204. We review all tips that we receive, regardless of how much information you provide. The more details you can give when reporting unemployment insurance fraud, the more it will help us investigate.

In addition to providing us the name of an individual you think might be associated with fraud, and the fraudulent activity, providing details such as their address, age, date of birth, or Social Security Number will help us identify the person in our claim records.

If you report someone is working full time while receiving benefits, it is helpful if you provide the name and address of the employer as well as how long the individual has been working for them, in addition to providing information about the individual. This will help us review claim and wage records to determine fraudulent activity.

We keep the information you provide confidential, and you can ask to remain anonymous when reporting unemployment insurance fraud. However, due to confidentiality laws, we are unable to provide the results of any investigation based on the information you provide. We appreciate your help.

FRAUD REFERRAL FORM

We publish a report every year about how fraud affects the program and Oregon's Unemployment Insurance Trust Fund. You can read our 2021 report and 2020 report